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First Time Home Buyers

First Things First

If you are making a particular meal for the first time, it is essential to have a recipe so that it turns out the way it should.  Knowing the ingredients and preparation can guide you through the process.

Buying a home is really no different than making a new recipe.  There are certain things that need to be done, many of which should occur in a particular order to save time, money, effort and disappointment.

Your first inclination may be to start searching the Internet for homes and schedule some showings or possibly visit open houses.  Even though this is very gratifying, it shouldn’t be done until you have gone through the preliminaries.

Buying a home for the first-time implies you haven’t been through the process before and even though, you may have a rough idea of what needs to be done, selecting the right agent in the beginning will give you the benefit of years of personal and professional experience that can help you avoid some of the common mistakes made when buying a home.

This agent can direct you to find the other team members that are required like the lender, title company, inspectors and others.  Each member of the team has an important role to play that if not done correctly, could cause delays and possibly, jeopardize the transaction.

An important step is getting pre-approved so that you’ll know exactly what price mortgage and home you’ll qualify for.  This may even allow you to lock-in a mortgage rate before you contract for a home.  The pre-approval could also prove very helpful in negotiating with the seller by removing some of the doubt in their mind regarding an unknown buyer.  Another advantage to pre-approval is that if you are competing with multiple offers, you have the advantage of being more of a known commodity.

You’ll need to assemble some documents for the lender including pay stubs from the past two months, W-2’s from last year, proof of additional income, tax returns for the past two years, bank statements for the last three months, list of all open credit accounts and balances, copy of driver’s license and history of residence for past two years.

Buying a home is one of the most important decisions in your life and it should be done with care and research.  When all the things are done in the right order, finding the “right” home is just like following a recipe.  For more information, download this Buyers Guide that includes great information to help you through the process and call us at 503-385-1518.

Reducing Housing Costs

Cutting Your Housing Costs in Half

Cutting the price will generally bring buyers of anything out of the woodwork that were not serious before.  Some renters could easily lower their monthly cost of housing by half or more by purchasing a home with all the financial benefits that come with it.

The most obvious thing in today’s market is that the mortgage payment could be less than the rent the tenants are paying.  With mortgage rates hovering around 3%, this is a major factor of the savings.

The two other major contributing factors are appreciation and amortization of the mortgage, neither of which benefit tenants continuing to pay rent.  According to the FHFA House Price Index, home prices rose 5.4% from July 2019 to July 2020.  There were 400,000 less homes on the market during the summer of 2020 than the previous summer which is influencing appreciation.

With each payment a homeowner makes on their mortgage, a portion is used to reduce the principal amount owed.  This is like a savings account for the owner because it lowers their unpaid balance and increases their equity.

The equity becomes an asset that can be accessed by doing a cash-out refinance or a home equity line of credit once the equity has reached 80% loan-to-value.

A $300,000 home purchased with an FHA loan at 3% for 30 years would have a payment of approximately $2,013 including principal and interest, taxes, insurance, and mortgage insurance premium.  If the tenant were paying $2,400 in rent, this would be a savings of almost $400 a month.

The monthly principal reduction would average $500 a month for the first year which would lower the net cost of housing.  The other major item to consider would be the appreciation.  Assuming, in this example, the home was appreciating at 3% annually, the monthly appreciation in the first year would be $750 which would further lower the cost of housing.

Rent

$2,400

Total House Payment

$2,013

Less Monthly Principal Reduction

$513

Less Monthly Appreciation

$750

Plus Estimated Monthly Maintenance

$200

Net Cost of Housing

$950

 

In this example, it would cost over $1,400 per month more to rent than to own.

A different approach to this would be that the equity in this home in seven years would be $121,579 based on appreciation and principal reduction.  If the same person continues to rent, there would be no equity build-up.

If you’re curious as to how much you could cut your housing cost, go to the Rent vs. Own or contact your real estate professional.